What is “rapid-fire learning”, and how does it apply to SAT preparation?

January 12, 2011 at 11:15 pm | Posted in SAT Advice | Leave a comment

“Rapid-fire learning” is a term we use at Perfect800 to describe the learning style we are trying to facilitate. As students, recent students, and teachers, we believe that the traditional learning model is changing to fit the “information now” culture of today’s society. Especially when it comes to test prep, we believe that students are growing tired of 45 minute lectures that teach them things they already know, or gloss over things they don’t quite understand. It doesn’t make sense to us that all students should have to learn the same material at the same pace when every student has different needs.

Furthermore, we don’t believe in “concept check” type questions that will never appear on an actual exam. As students who have aced tests our entire lives, we know that the most efficient way to prepare for any exam is to practice challenging exam questions. Therefore, we call the practice of quickly and efficiently going through exam questions “rapid-fire learning.” In our opinion, this is the fastest way to increase your test score, no matter what the exam. Using this philosophy, we built Perfect800.com – a Website designed to confront students with the very challenges they will face on exam day ahead of time. Because all of our questions are constructed by thoroughly studying real SAT questions, our content accurately reflects questions you may see on the real SAT. Attempting these questions beforehand and going through the methodology to solve them will assuredly give you a huge advantage over your peers.

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